Beneficiaries Using Adult Day Health Care Services Hit Hard with State’s Budget Revision

Beneficiaries Using Adult Day Health Care Services Hit Hard with State’s Budget Revision
Beneficiaries Using Adult Day Health Care Services Are Hit Hard with State’s Budget Revision
California’s older adults and people with disabilities who qualify for state-funded adult day health care (ADHC) may be some of the hardest hit from the recent state budget cuts. Governor Schwarzenegger signed the budget revisions last week that reduces the amount of days covered for adult day health care from 5 to 3 days per week. In addition, the budget revision eliminates funding for Alzheimer’s disease programs.
These cuts pose a significant challenge for many families who may not be able to afford private caregivers. They also create a paradox, as the cuts may, in the long-term, end up costing the state much more money. Adult day health care services help many people continue living at home in their communities, versus living in an institutional setting like a nursing home. With a 40% cut in services, many beneficiaries have to move into an institutional setting, costing the state more than twice the amount of money per person for each day of care. For example, Medi-Cal, California’s Medicaid program pays $76.50 per day for ADHC services, compared with $170 to $200 per day for nursing home care. Beneficiaries Using Adult Day Health Care Services Are Hit Hard with State’s Budget Revision
California’s older adults and people with disabilities who qualify for state-funded adult day health care (ADHC) may be some of the hardest hit from the recent state budget cuts. Governor Schwarzenegger signed the budget revisions last week that reduces the amount of days covered for adult day health care from 5 to 3 days per week. In addition, the budget revision eliminates funding for Alzheimer’s disease programs.
These cuts pose a significant challenge for many families who may not be able to afford private caregivers. They also create a paradox, as the cuts may, in the long-term, end up costing the state much more money. Adult day health care services help many people continue living at home in their communities, versus living in an institutional setting like a nursing home. With a 40% cut in services, many beneficiaries have to move into an institutional setting, costing the state more than twice the amount of money per person for each day of care. For example, Medi-Cal, California’s Medicaid program pays $76.50 per day for ADHC services, compared with $170 to $200 per day for nursing home care.

California’s older adults and people with disabilities who qualify for state-funded adult day health care (ADHC) may be some of the hardest hit from the recent state budget cuts. Governor Schwarzenegger signed the budget revisions last week that reduces the amount of days covered for adult day health care from 5 to 3 days per week. In addition, the budget revision eliminates funding for Alzheimer’s disease programs.

These cuts pose a significant challenge for many families who may not be able to afford private caregivers. They also create a paradox, as the cuts may, in the long-term, end up costing the state much more money. Adult day health care services help many people continue living at home in their communities, versus living in an institutional setting like a nursing home. With a 40% cut in services, many beneficiaries have to move into an institutional setting, costing the state more than twice the amount of money per person for each day of care. For example, Medi-Cal, California’s Medicaid program pays $76.50 per day for ADHC services, compared with $170 to $200 per day for nursing home care.

For updated information on the California budget, see:

For information on Medi-Cal and long-term care, see:

Our blogger Karen J. Fletcher is CHA's publications consultant. She provides technical expertise, writing and research on Medicare, health disparities and other health care issues. With a Masters in Public Health from UC Berkeley, she serves in health advocacy as a trainer and consultant. See her current articles.